I will never become a Christian

‘I will never become a Christian!’ I can remember saying that on one particular morning, yet even before that day was over I was a Christian! Maybe you’ve made a similar decision, but, if so, just think: all Christians were once non-Christians like you, because no one is born a Christian. What is more, very many Christians were once just as determined as you are never to believe in Christ. So your position is not unique; neither is it necessarily unchangeable.

People give many reasons for their insistence on not accepting the Christian faith, but perhaps the most common one, especially among young people, is that science has disproved the Bible; doesn’t becoming a Christian mean committing intellectual suicide? This sounds like a very reasonable argument. It seems to cut through emotion and faith, and rest on solid indisputable facts. But actually it’s a weak argument: even the alleged ‘facts’ of science are always changing. What scientists believed to be great discoveries of truth and fact fifty years ago have now been discarded for new truths and new facts. Science does have a valuable part to play in modern life, but be careful that you don’t make it into a religion and worship today what will inevitably be rejected in the future.

Has science disproved the Bible? Time magazine once ran a cover story on the Bible. This was its conclusion: ‘After more than two centuries of facing the heaviest scientific guns that could be brought to bear, the Bible has survived—and is perhaps the better for the siege. Even on the critics’ own terms—historical fact—the Scriptures seem more acceptable now than when the rationalists began the attack.’

No Christian need be embarrassed by what he or she believes. The ‘intellectual suicide’ argument is shown to have no real substance when you read statements like that of Professor T.L. More, a very vocal evolutionist: ‘The more one studies paleontology (the fossil record), the more certain one becomes that evolution is based on faith alone.’

What is a Christian?

A Christian is someone who knows he or she is a sinner.

There was a time when each Christian would have denied it. There was certainly a time when it did not bother them. But it became a matter of real concern. A sense of personal sin and guilt is the first step to anyone becoming a Christian. If we don’t face up to this and take our sin seriously, we will never become Christians.

A Christian is someone who knows he or she can do nothing to deal with personal sin.

Turning over a new leaf, pulling yourself up by your boot straps, trying your best; all these are the remedies of religion. Christians have probably tried them all at one time or another and found them to be useless in dealing with their sinful natures. But no Christian ever came to believe this quickly or easily. It goes right against the grain of human pride, but still it is an essential stage in becoming a Christian.

A Christian is someone who believes that there is only one answer to sin.

The answer is the one that God provides for us. Christians are sinners who have been saved by the grace of God from the consequences and power of sin. Grace means that salvation is a free gift from God to sinners who deserve the exact opposite. God, in love and grace, sent Jesus, his only Son, into this world to take the responsibility for our sin. That meant taking our guilt and punishment, and, when he died on the cross, he died as our substitute, taking our place. Now God offers us salvation because of what Jesus did for us. This is the only way of salvation.

Jesus said, ‘Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.’

To ‘come’ means to believe in Jesus, to trust what he did on your behalf and to commit your soul to him and look to him alone for forgiveness and salvation.

(If you are interested and want to read more on this subject, please read the book I Will Never Become a Christian published by Day One Publications, by Peter Jeffery.)

Peter Jeffery       © Day One Publications, www.dayone.co.uk



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